Emergency Dental Care

Same day emergency care

Same day emergency dental care and pain relief 

Even if you have not been to our practice before, and are looking for emergency dental treatment in Eynsham, Witney, and Oxford, we will do our best to help.

Weekends and Bank Holidays    01865 238438.

This offers weekend and holiday emergency dental treatment and advice between the hours of 9am and 5pm (call-out fee may apply to re-open surgery, free advice over telephone).

Denplan Emergency Helpline

(UK) 0880 844 999 (Worldwide) +44 1962 844 999

Denplan Patients who are away from home and unable to access emergency treatment 

or advice from us can access the Denplan Helpline

NHS patients

Diall 111

For the local NHS out of hours service

Some general information is given below. We advise you to contact us for personal care and advice in the event of an emergency.

Advice on dental emergencies

Tooth ache

Persistent pain of any nature should be checked by your dentist. Constant, severe pain usually indicates that a tooth is dying or infected. In the meantime, over-the-counter pain killers as advised by a pharmacist can help and avoid any precipitating factors - e.g. chewing hard foods or hot or cold drinks if this hurts. In all cases it is best to gets things checked as soon as possible.

Swollen face

This is usually caused by infection and treatment will be required. Contact the practice without delay. In the rare event a swelling in your mouth has become so large it is becoming seriously difficult to swallow or breathe, contact us immediately or the accident and emergency department of your local hospital if during night-time hours.

Broken tooth or filling

If the tooth is painful, avoid eating very hot or cold foods and chewing on that side. Painkillers may help. Contact the surgery to have the tooth assessed without too much delay as this may increase the risk of further damage to the tooth and possibly the nerve inside.

My crown/bridge has come off

The tooth may be sensitive to temperature so avoid very hot or cold drinks. Avoid eating on that side so food does not get trapped in the gum, which can cause discomfort. Keep the crown/bridge safe and bring it to your dentist; it should be re-cemented to avoid further damage to the underlying tooth and nerve.

Bleeding after an extraction

Ensure you are following all post-operative advice. Avoid physical activity. Apply constant pressure to the wound with the gauze your dentist has supplied, a clean piece of cotton or (although it may sound strange) a wet teabag. Do not dab the wound but keep firm pressure on it for 10 - 15 minutes. If after this you are still concerned, contact the surgery.

Pain after an extraction

A little pain and swelling following tooth extraction can usually be controlled by over-the-counter painkillers (ibuprofen/paracetamol). An ice pack applied to your face over the area may provide some additional relief. Ensure you avoid smoking and follow the post-operative advice given by your dentist. If you experience unusually severe pain not helped by these measures, or, which persist after a few days, please contact the surgery.

Broken denture

Broken dentures can usually be repaired and we have arrangements with local laboratories to have this done as quickly as possible. Contact the practice to arrange an appointment, as sometimes it is necessary to take an impression of your mouth so that the broken parts can be reliably relocated. If you live close by you may wish to call in during our opening hours, if a clinician is free they will check what needs to be done, however you may need to come back if an impression is needed or we are very busy. Contacting us early will allow us to get a repair organised as quick as possible for you.

Tooth knocked out

The tooth needs to be re-implanted as soon as possible. Immediately call us for an emergency appointment. Avoid touching the root to prevent microscopic damage to where the bone attaches. If the tooth is visibly dirty, rinse it gently with water but do not scrub. If you can, replace the tooth back in the socket and hold there until you see us. If this is difficult keep the tooth in iced milk.

Tooth pushed out of position

Attempt to gently re-position the tooth with very light finger pressure. Avoid eating and contact us.